The compromise of a deadline

Last week I had the assignment of covering two debates prior to Primary Day, which is Thursday, September 13.

Reminder: GO OUT AND VOTE! ūüôā

However,¬†debates are not very easy¬†to cover. Here’s why:

1. If the candidates do their job, there is a LOT of information

2. As a reporter, I have to pick and choose which issues to address

3. There isn’t much time to do so

4. It still has to be a cohesive story a viewer will want to watch

—————————————————————-

Unfortunately, the first night I didn’t make my 11 p.m. deadline. I was crushed. It still ran as the top story in our hyperlocal news block because of other political coverage that ran late, but that doesn’t excuse my failing.

So what happened? After racking my brain,¬†I believe it¬†truly came¬†down to wanting to put together the best piece¬†for the audience (Here it is). If you weren’t at the debate, well, by hook or by crook, NOW you’ve got what you need to know on the screen in front of you. In making this my goal, I got caught up in wording and sequencing and most importantly, fairness… and the production just went too long. I didn’t finish on time.

Angry at myself, I went on to the next night’s debate, determined to have my package in before 11.

I did.

Though proud I had met my goal, I realized there was a sacrifice made. As I was writing, editing, regurgitating, I kept telling myself, “It’s not going to be perfect, but¬†just get it done.”

—————————————————————-

Therein lies something deeper.

As a journalist, meeting your deadline can often become the highest priority. The news needs to be released IMMEDIATELY.

If only newsrooms were like http://www.savagechickens.com (yes, check it out)

But in the process, are we losing quality?

I know that I did. Before I went to bed that night, I admitted to myself¬†there was a better way I could’ve wrapped up that debate recap. The ending I used? Not horrible. Was it fluid? Could’ve been smoother.

It makes you wonder just how much good storytelling we lose because of the need to be first/prompt/within a certain time frame. Because we definitely do.

In the end, it comes down to whether you value the immediacy or the quality of the information. News… is news.

Advertisements

Right v. Wrong…I mean, Left. Wait, what?

I say ‘media.’ You say, __________.

Really, go ahead and fill in the blank.

Being a member of the media, I have found that more often than not, I am chalked up to be a liberal left-wing lover.

The media?

Then you learn I attend church. I wear a cross necklace. Immediately I am on the right, the perfect candidate to diversify Fox News.

The media… again?

Ironically, that confusion is a clear indicator to me that I was meant to be in the field of journalism.

Here’s my admission: Each time I find myself face-to-face with¬†an issue that divides our country and our homes,¬†conflict settles in my mind too.¬†I embark¬†on¬†my journalistic journey¬†to¬†hear from one side.¬†Behold, their words¬†make sense! I¬†then inteview an opposing party… and their pieces fall into place. By the end of my research, I’m not quite sure which way I lean.

Back to square one.

Some journalists take a position as they approach a story (hint: they won’t admit it, but they do).¬†Personally, I try to understand as much as possible before making¬†a call. Even then, it’s my goal to ensure others hear both sides. Of course, while I’m telling them, uncertainty often arises again.

Deep down, I know I have opinions. It’s taken years to develop them and confirm they align with what I believe is the Truth. I’m thankful to the wise thinkers who have given me insight. There are still many controversial topics that I haven’t let myself touch yet, but I will get there once I have heard near everything.

———————————————————————-

I will say this: there are some decisions that I will likely forego. At least, forego taking an outward stance.

Because… is it that important to have an opinion on everything?¬†Why cause discord when an open ear can heal?